Tag Archives: xi’an

British Theater To Stage “Romeo And Juliet” In Seven Chinese Cities

TNT Theater’s Tour Will Visit Tianjin, Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Beijing, Ningbo, Hangzhou And Xi’an

TNT's past staging of "Oliver Twist" was a big hit in Beijing

TNT's past staging of "Oliver Twist" was a big hit in Beijing

It seems that cultural exchanges between China and the rest of the world are becoming increasingly commonplace, with large-scale events like Carnegie Hall’s “Ancient Paths, Modern Voices” festivals in New York and Orange County, the “Experience China in Israel” event in Tel Aviv giving foreign audiences a chance to see a cultural cross-section. Over the past few years in China, foreign cultural organizations and groups have made regular trips to the country to give Chinese audiences a chance to do the same. The most recent of these cultural exchanges, a staging of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” performed by Britain’s TNT Theater, began its seven-city tour of China this week, and is set to perform the play throughout the country until November 29. From Xinhua:

Cui Yang, general manager of the Beijing-based Milky Way Arts and Communications Co., Ltd, the play’s importer, said the new version featured a cappella (singing without instrumental accompaniment) and live score which was specially commissioned for the play. 

 According to Cui, all the sound effects in the drama were created by human voices instead of being pre-recorded.

The TNT Theater, founded in 1980, has been distinguished for its simple stage decoration, strong British style and cross-gender performances. It has previously won the acclaim of Chinese audience with dramas such as Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist” and Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”.

In the run-up to next year’s Shanghai’s World Expo, and certainly in its aftermath, we should see a great deal more cultural exchange going on both inside and outside China, as more foreign audiences look to learn about China’s ancient and modern cultures, and Chinese audiences look to learn more about important global and historical trends.

Chinese Woman Spends $600,000 On Dog

Black Tibetan Mastiff Believed To Be The Most Expensive Dog In History

Chinese bloggers have had a field day with the story of Mrs. Wang and her 4 million RMB "master"

Chinese bloggers have had a field day with the story of Mrs. Wang and her 4 million RMB "master"

Several Chinese– and English-language outlets are reporting the sale of a black Tibetan Mastiff to a millionaire from China’s northern Shaanxi province for 4 million yuan (appx. $600,000), which, if an accurate figure, would make this the most expensive dog in history. As the AFP reports (via Sohu), the buyer — named only as “Mrs. Wang” — arranged an extravagant arrival for herself (and her new purchase) in the city of Xi’an:

A convoy of 30 black Mercedes-Benz cars, led by two sports utility vehicles, drove to the airport Wednesday to pick up the pair, who had arrived from the Tibetan-populated province of Qinghai in China’s northwest.

Photos of the event posted with the report showed a committee of dog-lovers holding up a long red banner welcoming the mastiff to Xi’an.

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Companies Promoting “Wine Tourism” For Chinese Oenophiles

French Wine Producers And Chinese Travel Agencies Teaming Up To Promote Wine Tourism In France

The wine market has grown rapidly in China, and wine tourism operators hope to entice the country's oenophiles with trips to French vineyards in coming years

The wine market has grown rapidly in China, and wine tourism operators hope to entice the country's oenophiles with trips to French vineyards in coming years

Last month, we posted on the Sotheby’s auction of fine wines in Hong Kong, at which 100% of the bottles up for grabs sold, mostly to local Hong Kong and Mainland Chinese buyers. Over the past few years, as wine drinking has grown in popularity in China and the buyer base has grown accordingly, vineyards from around the globe have intensified their efforts to crack this vast yet still niche-oriented market.

While these vintners’ dreams may still be a bit naive in terms of the macro-level Chinese market — as BusinessWeek reflects with a quote by a Californian winery owner, “If we sold a bottle of wine to every Chinese millionaire, we’d run out of wine before we ran out of millionaires!” — it is a fact that Chinese buyers of fine wines are quickly joining the ranks of other global buyers, and companies from travel agencies to vineyards are keen to get in on this burgeoning business.

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