Tag Archives: LV

Ralph Lauren Planning To Open 15 New Stores Annually In China

Fashion Brand Sees Potential To Broaden Foothold In Lucrative, Yet Challenging Fashion Market

 

Ralph Lauren's sole free-standing location in China is located in Shanghai's luxury Jin Jiang Dickson Center. The company plans to branch out very rapidly in coming years

Ralph Lauren's sole free-standing location in China is located in Shanghai's luxury Jin Jiang Dickson Center. The company plans to branch out very rapidly in coming years

Wing-Gar Cheng writes for Bloomberg today that American retailer Ralph Lauren hopes to open 15 new stores in China annually in coming years. While the signature Ralph Lauren style has been adapted — or “copied”, depending who you ask — by brands with a long-time presence in China, like South Korea’s E-Land (not to mention counterfeiters throughout the country), the number of free-standing Ralph Lauren locations has remained limited. With the global demand for higher-end items remaining relatively anemic in the North American, Japanese, and European markets — despite improvements — China, with the high potential of its second- and third-tier cities, remains a sought-after target by mid- to higher-range fashion brands like Ralph Lauren. 

As Cheng writes, rapid expansion in China is not simply driven by idealism. There is a great deal of untapped potential throughout the underserved mainland, well illustrated by a quote by George Hrdina, president of Ralph Lauren’s Asian business, who said, “We do more Ralph Lauren business on the island of Manhattan, New York, than we do in Hong Kong and China.” Clearly, adding 15 stores per year is less unrealistic than it may initially sound.

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Dunhill Fuses Brand And Lifestyle In Shanghai

Bar, Part Of Dunhill Flagship Store At Plaza 66, Extends Dunhill’s British Style  And Traditional Atmosphere

The Aquarium by Kee in Plaza 66, Photo © Shanghai Daily

The Aquarium by Kee in Plaza 66, Photo © Shanghai Daily

Plaza 66, a sprawling office and mall complex in Shanghai’s Jing’an District, recently unveiled the new Aquarium by Kee bar, part of the Alfred Dunhill flagship store. Designed to be an after-work sanctuary for the area’s businesspeople, the 40-seat bar extends Dunhill’s sophisticated style to every aspect of its decor as well as its drinks list.Unique marketing efforts like this are nothing new to Dunhill’s China operations, which last year built the world’s fourth Alfred Dunhill “Home” in Shanghai, following London, Paris, and Tokyo. These “Homes” are designed to represent the sort of lifestyle promoted by Dunhill (as well as their products), and function as private clubs that, as Dunhill CCO Sven Gaede said, “are not just retail environments, but will also incorporate ancillary services such as a club, restaurant, spa, and barber shop, as well as bespoke tailor services and Bentley chauffeur services.”

In Shanghai, Dunhill is extending their exclusive marketing tack to appeal to many (primarily male) luxury buyers’ desire for “sanctuaries.” With few places remaining in this bustling city to have a calm drink or relax among other businesspeople, Dunhill is basically importing the old British model of the men’s club to Shanghai, where China has always had its own versions of this. Mixing them together — and throwing retail into the mix — Dunhill is scoring what I would consider a marketing coup. Brand-Lifestyle tie-ins have become incredibly successful in Asia in recent years (Just look at the “Passion for Creation” exhibition in Hong Kong), and Dunhill’s male-centric strategy will probably pay dividends. Their brand is already well-established in China among middle-aged luxury consumers, so they have to go beyond simple brand-building to brand sustainability and flexibility — what works in Shanghai may not work in Beijing or Chongqing.

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China’s Luxury Market A Tough Nut To Crack (If You Don’t Know The Culture)

Brands, Companies With Limited Knowledge Of Cultural Buying Habits, Brand Recognition Face Difficulty Even In World’s Fastest-Growing Market

Porsche has worked hard to prove to potential buyers in China that they are a critical part of the brand's global strategy, choosing the Shanghai Auto Show as the venue to debut their new Panamera Turbo

Porsche has worked hard to prove to potential buyers in China that they are a critical part of the brand's global strategy, choosing the Shanghai Auto Show as the venue to debut their new Panamera Turbo

This week, Reuters wrote on the difficulties that many brands have encountered when trying to enter or expand in the Chinese market. Although many like to think that Chinese consumers will be ready and willing to snap up any and all imported luxury goods, the difficulties often lie not so much in the products themselves or their prices, but in their marketing and branding techniques. Everything from the transliteration of a foreign luxury brand’s name to its “localization” strategy to advertising and consumer outreach can mean the difference between an imported brand becoming the next LVMH or BMW (two brands that have excelled in China) and brands that have only managed to break even or have given up on the Mainland altogether.

Over the last couple of months, several articles have tried to explain the phenomenon of the Chinese luxury consumer — the opportunity and difficulties inherent in this massive and growing consumer base. Why will they save for months to buy a Gucci handbag, yet will pass up the lower-priced yet still-luxury Coach bag? Why will the white-collar office lady sacrifice her food budget for a Gucci wallet yet remain indifferent to Prada? Why have some (mainly European) brands attracted this important luxury buyer base while other brands leave them cold? Much of the answer seems to come back to the cultural particularities of the Chinese middle- and upper-class, particularities that set them apart from other Asian consumers and illustrate how different they are from other global buyers.

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Macau: A Complex (And Exciting) Destination in the PRC

Macau, Having Already Surpassed Las Vegas As A Gambling Destination, Sets Its Sights On Cultural, Culinary Offerings To Lure Tourists

Macau has quickly established itself as the "Vegas of the East"

Macau has quickly established itself as the "Vegas of the East"

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Since its handover in 1999, Macau has rapidly become one of Asia’s top destinations for gambling, luring thousands of gamers from mainland China and Hong Kong. If Macau’s tourism department has its way, though, the city will soon be as renowned as a cultural destination as well — playing on its unique blend of Portuguese colonial and Chinese culture, architecture, and culinary traditions. Although construction of luxury apartments and casinos has slowed somewhat due to the global economic crisis, the city looks at the continuing growth of the Chinese tourist as a way to buoy a relatively sluggish tourism season.

Macau is unique in that it has, much like neighboring Hong Kong, combined two disparate cultures over the centuries to the point where they no longer seem distinct but instead form the one-of-a-kind Macanese culture. The city has also combined the entrepreneurial, fast-paced culture of China’s biggest cities with a fascinating mix of people, cultures, and languages, making this one of the world’s most exciting, truly global cities. The city has also become one of East Asia’s luxury hubs.

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