Tag Archives: japanese

Spanish Ham Producers Hope To “Bring Home The Bacon” In China

Spanish Luxury Exporters Look To China As New Market For Rare And Expensive Ham, Jewelry

Spanish ham producers are hoping to get their products associated with wealth and sophistication in China

Spanish ham producers are hoping to get their products associated with wealth and sophistication in China

When people think of China — or the eating habits of urban Chinese — they probably don’t think of Spanish ham. But if Spanish ham producers have their way, China will be one of their top markets in coming years. Recently, after years of trade negotiations, Spanish ham was given the greenlight in China, after which they began a marketing blitz designed to get their products associated with wealth, luxury, and distinction among wealthy Chinese. To start off this marketing effort, a Spanish ham tasting event was held recently at Beijing’s LAN Club, one of the city’s most exclusive restuarant/nightclubs, along with a Spanish jewelry modeling show. Additionally, ham producers began a simultaneous effort to woo Japanese residents in China’s major cities, as these consumers — some of the world’s most seasoned luxury buyers — are already familiar with Spanish hams and require less dedicated marketing efforts.

As the Latin American Herald Tribune writes, as for every industry the Chinese market has great potential as a destination for ham producers, but it won’t be easy to convince Chinese buyers to spend top dollar on a culinary product with which they’re not that familiar — particularly in the age of swine flu:

The ham, produced in Extremadura by the Montesano company and distributed in China by the Olivarero Chinese Spanish Consortium, or COCE, was the star of a luxurious and glitzy evening at the distinguished club, although the jewelry of Madrid designer Paloma Sanchez, who has a store in Beijing, was also prominently featured.

“This is an event to launch the ham in Beijing, to see if there’s any demand and position (it) as an exclusive luxury product, for the upper class. Therefore, we’ve accompanied it with the jewelry show,” said Daniel Martin, COCE’s general director and the organizer of the event.

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Japan’s Mitsuoka Motor Co. To Enter Chinese Market

Japanese Luxury Automaker Plans To Open Beijing Showroom By Q1 2010

The Mitsuoka Orochi will retail for around 800,000 RMB (US $117,177) in China when it arrives next year

The Mitsuoka Orochi will retail for around 800,000 RMB (US $117,177) in China when it arrives next year

The growing Chinese luxury market is a prime target for many Asian companies that have found demand in their home countries — mainly South Korea and Japan — either growing at a snail’s pace or simply remaining stagnant. As formerly luxury-mad consumers in traditional markets like Japan cut back on their spending, high-end Japanese companies have started to look abroad for more opportunities, with China remaining the natural choice as a result of its proximity and massive population.

Recently, Japan’s Mitsuoka Motor Co., one of the country’s major luxury automakers, announced their plans to enter the Chinese market next year, starting with a showroom in Beijing that is slated to open in April. To lead their China efforts, the company will display their Orochi model at next year’s Beijing Auto Show and follow up their Beijing strategy with new dealerships in other top-tier cities:

The Orochi will spearhead Mitsuoka’s debut into China. The company plans to display the car at next year’s Beijing Auto Show, and to open dealerships in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou.

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Automotive Brand-Building In China: Opportunities And Challenges Abound

Western, Chinese Brands Vie For Customer Loyalty As Emerging Middle Class And “Nouveau Riche” Demand Continues To Grow

Buick has capitalized on its reputation for quality and luxury in the Chinese market, enjoying massive success and launching China-only models like the Excelle

Buick has capitalized on its reputation for quality and luxury in the Chinese market, enjoying massive success and launching China-only models like the Excelle

As demand for new vehicles has remained sluggish in developed markets over the past two years, major automakers have rightly looked to retool their strategies to draw customers and build their brands in new markets. As we’ve written before, selling your brand in markets like China, where customers expect different things — and derive status from very specific brand attributes —  represents both a major opportunity and a new challenge. A good example of an automaker that has benefitted from the “blank slate” allowed it by entry into the young Chinese market is Buick, which has a reputation as a car for older, or middle-aged, drivers in its native market, the USA, yet has — through aggressive branding and advertising efforts — developed a reputation as a sleek, luxurious, youthful brand in the Chinese market.

So how can car brands optimize their brand equity in China? Depending on where they come from, their strategies differ greatly. While American car makers like Ford have had great success in overseas markets like Europe by pushing their reliability and value, in the Chinese market imported cars are, generally, chosen by buyers to be a status symbol, rather than “inexpensive.” Ford, then, cannot compete on price alone, as Chinese automakers like Chery and Geely — which have sizeable lineups of entry-level models — will always be able to undercut them. As a result, it is important for foreign car makers to not just build their brand in China, but to build a strong brand in China, one that speaks to Chinese consumers in a way that domestically-produced autos cannot. To break it down further, foreign automakers need to build a strong, distinctive brand — a German car must fit Chinese conceptions of German cars, Japanese cars Japanese attributes and so on.

In practice, how are foreign automakers faring in their Chinese branding strategies? Today, Reuters looks into the “uphill road” these brands are traveling in China, and how they have refocused their branding strategies to varying degrees of success. Using the example of a “nouveau riche” car buyers who has traded his BMW in for an Audi  — since the Audi has developed a strong reputation in China as a car for bureaucrats or (comparatively) “old money” while BMW is considered a brand for the nouveau riche (a group into which the buyer in question is loath to be grouped) — the article provides valuable insight into the particularities of a market so new that even seasoned marketers and branding execs are often at a loss to develop long-term strategies.

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