Tag Archives: guangzhou

British Theater To Stage “Romeo And Juliet” In Seven Chinese Cities

TNT Theater’s Tour Will Visit Tianjin, Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Beijing, Ningbo, Hangzhou And Xi’an

TNT's past staging of "Oliver Twist" was a big hit in Beijing

TNT's past staging of "Oliver Twist" was a big hit in Beijing

It seems that cultural exchanges between China and the rest of the world are becoming increasingly commonplace, with large-scale events like Carnegie Hall’s “Ancient Paths, Modern Voices” festivals in New York and Orange County, the “Experience China in Israel” event in Tel Aviv giving foreign audiences a chance to see a cultural cross-section. Over the past few years in China, foreign cultural organizations and groups have made regular trips to the country to give Chinese audiences a chance to do the same. The most recent of these cultural exchanges, a staging of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” performed by Britain’s TNT Theater, began its seven-city tour of China this week, and is set to perform the play throughout the country until November 29. From Xinhua:

Cui Yang, general manager of the Beijing-based Milky Way Arts and Communications Co., Ltd, the play’s importer, said the new version featured a cappella (singing without instrumental accompaniment) and live score which was specially commissioned for the play. 

 According to Cui, all the sound effects in the drama were created by human voices instead of being pre-recorded.

The TNT Theater, founded in 1980, has been distinguished for its simple stage decoration, strong British style and cross-gender performances. It has previously won the acclaim of Chinese audience with dramas such as Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist” and Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”.

In the run-up to next year’s Shanghai’s World Expo, and certainly in its aftermath, we should see a great deal more cultural exchange going on both inside and outside China, as more foreign audiences look to learn about China’s ancient and modern cultures, and Chinese audiences look to learn more about important global and historical trends.

Japan’s Mitsuoka Motor Co. To Enter Chinese Market

Japanese Luxury Automaker Plans To Open Beijing Showroom By Q1 2010

The Mitsuoka Orochi will retail for around 800,000 RMB (US $117,177) in China when it arrives next year

The Mitsuoka Orochi will retail for around 800,000 RMB (US $117,177) in China when it arrives next year

The growing Chinese luxury market is a prime target for many Asian companies that have found demand in their home countries — mainly South Korea and Japan — either growing at a snail’s pace or simply remaining stagnant. As formerly luxury-mad consumers in traditional markets like Japan cut back on their spending, high-end Japanese companies have started to look abroad for more opportunities, with China remaining the natural choice as a result of its proximity and massive population.

Recently, Japan’s Mitsuoka Motor Co., one of the country’s major luxury automakers, announced their plans to enter the Chinese market next year, starting with a showroom in Beijing that is slated to open in April. To lead their China efforts, the company will display their Orochi model at next year’s Beijing Auto Show and follow up their Beijing strategy with new dealerships in other top-tier cities:

The Orochi will spearhead Mitsuoka’s debut into China. The company plans to display the car at next year’s Beijing Auto Show, and to open dealerships in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou.

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The Rise Of China’s Megacities: Good For Business?

Six Cities – Tianjin, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Chongqing, Chengdu and Wuhan – Expected To Join The “Megacity” Ranks, With Real Urban Populations Exceeding 10 Million, In Next 15 Years

Six cities should join the ranks of "megacities" like Beijing and Shanghai in the next 15 years. Who will cash in on the new opportunities that will arise?

Six cities should join the ranks of "megacities" like Beijing and Shanghai in the next 15 years. Who will cash in on the new opportunities that will arise?

One of the greatest engines of China’s rapid economic growth has undoubtedly been the massive in-migration of the rural population into the wealthy coastal area. Although this influx has slowed, and even reversed somewhat, as a result of the global economic slowdown, for China’s major cities, its cosmopolitan centers, urban population growth is expected to continue growing for at least the next 10-15 years. As China’s top-tier cities, Beijing and Shanghai, become even more competitive and second- and third-tier cities present young professionals with better job options, the rank of Chinese “megacities” — cities with populations exceeding 10 million — are expected to be joined by six cities: Tianjin, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Chongqing, Chengdu and Wuhan. According to a post today on FT’s Dragonbeat blog, the rise of the new Chinese megacity will present new challenges for urban planners. However, I think they will also present unique opportunities.

Tom Miller writes for the Financial Times:

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Chinese High-End Consumers Reluctant To “Trade Down”

Those With A Taste For Luxury Goods In Emerging Markets Less Willing To Cut Back, HK Study Finds

While China has not remained unscathed by the global economic crisis, its luxury consumer market shows resilience in consumer confidence and willingness to shell out

While China has not remained unscathed by the global economic crisis, its luxury consumer market shows resilience in consumer confidence and willingness to shell out

One of the more surprising features of the global economic downturn, to some commentators, has been the relative health of the Asian consumer market throughout the crisis. Although developed markets like Japan and Korea have certainly been hit hard — as their high-tech and automotive export markets have declined substantially — emerging markets like Greater China and, to a lesser extent, India, where income gaps are still quite large and wealthy consumers have developed a taste for luxury goods are doing comparatively well.

This is not to say China hasn’t been hit by the slowdown — it has, as low-tech manufacturers and mass producers have, in many parts of the country, been forced to shut down or lay off thousands of workers. However, we are seeing that the specific class of Chinese luxury consumer is continuing to spend through the global recession, perhaps as a sort of badge of wealth, perhaps because these consumers just want to keep buying. There are plenty of theories why Chinese luxury consumers, unlike those in Japan and North America, aren’t waiting to buy their next handbag or car — however, one Hong Kong study in particular caught my eye:

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The Pearl River Delta Rises On A Tide Of Art Developments

The Influential Trio Of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, And Guangzhou Roar To Life For Events Like The Guangzhou Triennial

ART HK 09 takes place from May 14-17

ART HK 09 takes place from May 14-17

Art collectors and lovers are looking to Hong Kong to become Greater China’s devoted art epicenter. The region’s already-enacted duty law reforms, smooth business culture, and unique blend of Asian and Western culture have made it, and continue to make it, the world’s meeting ground. In the arts, this is no exception. Taking place in the heart of China’s wealth factory, the Pearl River Delta of Hong Kong, Shenzhen and Guangzhou — where the Mainland’s first experiments with capitalism took place in the late 1970s — annual events like the Guangzhou Biennial and the upcoming Hong Kong Art Fair (ART HK 09) are big draws for China’s emerging art consumer, the wealthy, investment-savvy “New Chinese Collector.”

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