Daily Archives: September 17, 2009

An Urban Oasis In Hong Kong

The Masterpiece Looks To Become One Of The City’s Most Exclusive Residential Towers

Apartments at The Masterpiece feature breathtaking views of Hong Kong -- and have pricetags to match

Apartments at The Masterpiece feature breathtaking views of Hong Kong -- and have price tags to match


The Standard today profiles the Masterpiece
, a luxurious residential tower in Hong Kong’s Tsim Sha Tsui district. Even in a city like Hong Kong, which is no stranger to extravagant residential towers, the Masterpiece stands out:

The exceptionally spacious apartments, featuring a floor-to-floor height of 11 feet and two inches, have a neutral interior that creates a warm and harmonious ambience.

The motto for the bar is if you have got it, flaunt it, and the wine cellar that is at the heart of it is the perfect showcase for your French and other vintages to relatives, friends and colleagues.

The master en suite bedroom continues the neutral-hued design. An atlas feature on the bedroom wall exudes a cosmopolitan feel, and the walk-in closet offers storage aplenty while the full-length mirror deepens the sense of space.

The other bedrooms also exhibit well-thought-out designs. One of them features a Japanese feel that continues the cosmopolitan theme.

The New World Development and Urban Renewal Authority joint development offers a plethora of leisure and shopping spots at your feet in the form of the recently built, six-story K11 mall below.

The exclusive clubhouse offers plenty of indoor and outdoor facilities to ensure your work-life balance, and the sky garden is an urban oasis amid the hustle and bustle of city life.

With a Tsim Sha Tsui MTR exit just across the road from the building, the Masterpiece combines luxury, style and convenience in one of the most desirable addresses in town.

The Global Yuan: What It Means For Chinese Assets

China’s Monetary Policies Look To Favor Yuan, Gold At Dollar’s Expense: What Will This Mean For Art Collectors & Investors In “Portable China”?

Art Collectors and other holders of "Portable China" can benefit from the globalization of the yuan if they're in it for the medium- to long term

Art Collectors and other holders of "Portable China" can benefit from the globalization of the yuan if they're in it for the medium- to long term

Today, Business Intelligence looks into China’s monetary policies, and how they are increasingly favoring alternate investment vehicles like gold while putting a dent in the US dollar. For investors looking to diversify their holdings into a number of areas to lower risk and exposure to market fluctuations, what will the simultaneous increase in asset diversification, global economic jitters, the ascendance of China and internationalization of its currency have on those who put their money into Chinese assets? The article does a fairly good job of illustrating the long-term effects these market forces will have on these investors as well as China itself:

In a series of recent policy moves and announcements through official channels, or increasingly through indirect ‘economic ambassador’ addressing conferences or talking to western reporters, China’s intentions and ambitions are becoming clearer.

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“Re-Enter The Dragon”: What Will Chinese Investment In Australia Do For The Arts?

After Failed Business Deals Earlier In The Year, Chinese Investment In Australia Is Back In A Big Way

Despite setbacks, Chinese-Australian business ties have deepened in the last few years

Despite setbacks, Chinese-Australian business ties have deepened in the last few years

The Australian reports this week that Australia remains a popular destination for Chinese investments, even after the ill-fated Chinalco-Rio Tinto negotiations earlier this year and China’s subsequent incarceration of Rio executive Stern Hu, an Australian national, along with three of his Chinese colleagues:

[T]he core complementary elements that have increasingly driven the economies together — Australia’s need for capital and for markets, China’s need for inputs for its industrial machine, and for international enmeshment — have not changed.

Paul Glasson, Shanghai-based managing director of Sigiriya Capital, a leading figure in putting together deals between Chinese and Australian companies, says: “The core proposition between Australia and China remains the same. The bottom line demand and desire to supply resources has not changed.”

This became palpable when Resources Minister Martin Ferguson flew to Beijing to initial on August 18 the deal through which state-owned giant PetroChina agreed to buy $50bn worth of gas from the Gorgon field off Western Australia.

With scant notice, he secured a brief but crucial meeting with the central player in China’s zou chu qu — go global — campaign, the chairman of the immensely powerful National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), Zhang Ping.

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